Eric Anholt (anholt) wrote,
Eric Anholt
anholt

This week in vc4 (2017-01-02): thread switching, CI

The 3DMMES test has been thoroughly instruction count limited, so any wins we can get on code generation translate pretty directly into performance gains.  Last week I decided to work on fixing up Jonas's patch to schedule instructions in the delay slots of thread switching, which can save us 3 instructions per texture sample.

Thread switching, you may recall, is a trick in the fragment shader to hide texture fetch latency by cooperatively switching to another fragment shader instance after you request a texture fetch, so that it can make some progress when you'd probably be blocked anyway.  This lets us better occupy the ALUs, at the cost of each shader needing to fit into half of the physical register file.

However, VC4 doesn't cancel instructions in the pipeline when we request a switch (same as for within-shader branching), so 3 more instructions from the current shader get executed.  For my first implementation of thread switching, I just dumped in 3 NOPs after each THRSW to fill the delay slots.  This was still a massive win over not threading, so it was good enough.

Jonas's patch tries to fill the delay slots after we schedule in the thread switch by trying to extract the THRSW signal off of the instruction we scheduled and move it up to 2 instructions before that, and then only add enough NOPs to get us 3 slots filled.  There was a little bug (it re-scheduled the thrsw instruction instead of a NOP in trying to pad out to delay slots), but it basically worked and got us a 1.55% instruction count win on shader-db.

The problem was that he was scheduling ALU operations along with the thrsw, and if the thrsw signal was alone without an ALU operation in it, after moving the thrsw up we'd have a NOP left in the old location.  I wrote a followon patch to fix that: We now only schedule thrsws on their own without ALU operations, insert the THRSW as early as we can, and then add NOPs as necessary to fill remaining delay slots.  This was another 0.41% instruction count win.

This isn't as good as it could be.  Maybe we don't fill the slots as well as we could before choosing to schedule thrsw, but instructions we choose to schedule after that could be fit in.  Those would be tricky because we have to check that they don't write flags or the accumulators (which wouldn't be preserved across the thrsw) or new texture coordinates.  We also don't put the THRSW at any particular point in the timeline between sampler request and results collection.  We might be able to get wins by trying to put thrsw at the lowest-register-pressure point between them, so that fewer things need to be forced into physical regs instead of accumulators.

Those will be projects for later.  It's probably much more important that we figure out how to schedule 2-4 samples with a single thrsw, instead of doing a thrsw per sample like we do today.

The other project last week was starting to build up a plan for vc4 CI.  We've had a few regressions to vc4 in Mesa master because developers (including me!) don't do testing on vc4 hardware on every commit.  The Intel folks have a lovely CI system that does piglit, DEQP, and performance regression testing for them, both tracking Mesa master and doing pre-commit tests of voluntarily submitted branches.  I despaired of the work needed to build something that good, but apparently they've open sourced their configuration, so I'll be trying to replicate that in the next few weeks.  This week I worked on getting the hardware and a plan for where to host it.  I'm looking forward to a bright future of 30-minute test runs on the actual hardware and long-term tracking of performance metrics.  Unfortunately, there are no docs to it and I've never worked with jenkins before, so this is going to be a challenge.

Other things: I submitted a patch to mm/ to shut up the CMA warning we've been suffering from (and patching away downstream) for years, got exactly the expected response ("this dmesg spew in an common path might be useful for somebody debugging something some day, so it should stay there"), so hopefully we can just get Fedora and Debian to patch it out instead.  This is yet another data point in favor of Matthew Garrett's plan of "write kernel patches you need, don't bother submitting them upstream". Started testing a new patch to reduce error return rate on vc4 memory allocatoins on upstream kernel, haven't confirmed that it's working yet.  I also spent a lot of time reviewing tarceri's patches to Mesa preparing for the on-disk shader cache, which should help improve app startup times and reduce memory consumption.
Tags: vc4
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